Black Presence
Black History
Black Presence
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The History of A Black History Website
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As thousands of Malians prepare to return home, IDMC warns of a harsh reality
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Some of the Caribbean Women who served in the British Armed Forces in World War 2. Find out more about 
Caribbean Women in WW2
Some of the Caribbean Women who served in the British Armed Forces in World War 2. Find out more about 
Caribbean Women in WW2
Some of the Caribbean Women who served in the British Armed Forces in World War 2. Find out more about 
Caribbean Women in WW2
Some of the Caribbean Women who served in the British Armed Forces in World War 2. Find out more about 
Caribbean Women in WW2
Some of the Caribbean Women who served in the British Armed Forces in World War 2. Find out more about 
Caribbean Women in WW2
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Samuel Coleridge-Taylor
Visiting Nantes’ dark history in France: The Slavery trail in NANTES HISTORY MUSEUM
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howtobeterrell:

    An enslaved African draws a slave ship on a wall in Brazil. Centuries later Jean Michel Basquiat does the same in his famous graffiti lettering, introducing the world of high art and wealth to Hip Hop. 
What do these ambitious drawings tell us about our naming? “The Tribe of the Middle Passage” as Saidiya Hartman calls it in Lose Your Mother. 
 Consider Paul Gilroy in The Black Atlantic: 

I have settled on the image of ships in motion across the spaces between Europe, America, Africa, and the Caribbean as a central organising symbol for this enterprise and as my starting point. The image of the ship— a living, microcultural, micro-political system in motion— is especially important for historical and theoretical reasons…. Ships immediately focus attention on the middle passage, on the various projects for redemptive return to an African homeland, on the circulation of ideas and activists as well as the movement of key cultural and political artefacts: tracts, books, gramophone records, and choirs. (4)

More and more I’ve been pondering on this thought that my real home IS NOT West Africa.. It’s Good Intent, Hope, Jesus (names of real slaveships). Perhaps this is where “I” was first made. The hell of the slave ship is my inheritance. 
howtobeterrell:

    An enslaved African draws a slave ship on a wall in Brazil. Centuries later Jean Michel Basquiat does the same in his famous graffiti lettering, introducing the world of high art and wealth to Hip Hop. 
What do these ambitious drawings tell us about our naming? “The Tribe of the Middle Passage” as Saidiya Hartman calls it in Lose Your Mother. 
 Consider Paul Gilroy in The Black Atlantic: 

I have settled on the image of ships in motion across the spaces between Europe, America, Africa, and the Caribbean as a central organising symbol for this enterprise and as my starting point. The image of the ship— a living, microcultural, micro-political system in motion— is especially important for historical and theoretical reasons…. Ships immediately focus attention on the middle passage, on the various projects for redemptive return to an African homeland, on the circulation of ideas and activists as well as the movement of key cultural and political artefacts: tracts, books, gramophone records, and choirs. (4)

More and more I’ve been pondering on this thought that my real home IS NOT West Africa.. It’s Good Intent, Hope, Jesus (names of real slaveships). Perhaps this is where “I” was first made. The hell of the slave ship is my inheritance. 
howtobeterrell:

    An enslaved African draws a slave ship on a wall in Brazil. Centuries later Jean Michel Basquiat does the same in his famous graffiti lettering, introducing the world of high art and wealth to Hip Hop. 
What do these ambitious drawings tell us about our naming? “The Tribe of the Middle Passage” as Saidiya Hartman calls it in Lose Your Mother. 
 Consider Paul Gilroy in The Black Atlantic: 

I have settled on the image of ships in motion across the spaces between Europe, America, Africa, and the Caribbean as a central organising symbol for this enterprise and as my starting point. The image of the ship— a living, microcultural, micro-political system in motion— is especially important for historical and theoretical reasons…. Ships immediately focus attention on the middle passage, on the various projects for redemptive return to an African homeland, on the circulation of ideas and activists as well as the movement of key cultural and political artefacts: tracts, books, gramophone records, and choirs. (4)

More and more I’ve been pondering on this thought that my real home IS NOT West Africa.. It’s Good Intent, Hope, Jesus (names of real slaveships). Perhaps this is where “I” was first made. The hell of the slave ship is my inheritance. 
howtobeterrell:

    An enslaved African draws a slave ship on a wall in Brazil. Centuries later Jean Michel Basquiat does the same in his famous graffiti lettering, introducing the world of high art and wealth to Hip Hop. 
What do these ambitious drawings tell us about our naming? “The Tribe of the Middle Passage” as Saidiya Hartman calls it in Lose Your Mother. 
 Consider Paul Gilroy in The Black Atlantic: 

I have settled on the image of ships in motion across the spaces between Europe, America, Africa, and the Caribbean as a central organising symbol for this enterprise and as my starting point. The image of the ship— a living, microcultural, micro-political system in motion— is especially important for historical and theoretical reasons…. Ships immediately focus attention on the middle passage, on the various projects for redemptive return to an African homeland, on the circulation of ideas and activists as well as the movement of key cultural and political artefacts: tracts, books, gramophone records, and choirs. (4)

More and more I’ve been pondering on this thought that my real home IS NOT West Africa.. It’s Good Intent, Hope, Jesus (names of real slaveships). Perhaps this is where “I” was first made. The hell of the slave ship is my inheritance. 
howtobeterrell:

    An enslaved African draws a slave ship on a wall in Brazil. Centuries later Jean Michel Basquiat does the same in his famous graffiti lettering, introducing the world of high art and wealth to Hip Hop. 
What do these ambitious drawings tell us about our naming? “The Tribe of the Middle Passage” as Saidiya Hartman calls it in Lose Your Mother. 
 Consider Paul Gilroy in The Black Atlantic: 

I have settled on the image of ships in motion across the spaces between Europe, America, Africa, and the Caribbean as a central organising symbol for this enterprise and as my starting point. The image of the ship— a living, microcultural, micro-political system in motion— is especially important for historical and theoretical reasons…. Ships immediately focus attention on the middle passage, on the various projects for redemptive return to an African homeland, on the circulation of ideas and activists as well as the movement of key cultural and political artefacts: tracts, books, gramophone records, and choirs. (4)

More and more I’ve been pondering on this thought that my real home IS NOT West Africa.. It’s Good Intent, Hope, Jesus (names of real slaveships). Perhaps this is where “I” was first made. The hell of the slave ship is my inheritance. 
howtobeterrell:

    An enslaved African draws a slave ship on a wall in Brazil. Centuries later Jean Michel Basquiat does the same in his famous graffiti lettering, introducing the world of high art and wealth to Hip Hop. 
What do these ambitious drawings tell us about our naming? “The Tribe of the Middle Passage” as Saidiya Hartman calls it in Lose Your Mother. 
 Consider Paul Gilroy in The Black Atlantic: 

I have settled on the image of ships in motion across the spaces between Europe, America, Africa, and the Caribbean as a central organising symbol for this enterprise and as my starting point. The image of the ship— a living, microcultural, micro-political system in motion— is especially important for historical and theoretical reasons…. Ships immediately focus attention on the middle passage, on the various projects for redemptive return to an African homeland, on the circulation of ideas and activists as well as the movement of key cultural and political artefacts: tracts, books, gramophone records, and choirs. (4)

More and more I’ve been pondering on this thought that my real home IS NOT West Africa.. It’s Good Intent, Hope, Jesus (names of real slaveships). Perhaps this is where “I” was first made. The hell of the slave ship is my inheritance. 
howtobeterrell:

    An enslaved African draws a slave ship on a wall in Brazil. Centuries later Jean Michel Basquiat does the same in his famous graffiti lettering, introducing the world of high art and wealth to Hip Hop. 
What do these ambitious drawings tell us about our naming? “The Tribe of the Middle Passage” as Saidiya Hartman calls it in Lose Your Mother. 
 Consider Paul Gilroy in The Black Atlantic: 

I have settled on the image of ships in motion across the spaces between Europe, America, Africa, and the Caribbean as a central organising symbol for this enterprise and as my starting point. The image of the ship— a living, microcultural, micro-political system in motion— is especially important for historical and theoretical reasons…. Ships immediately focus attention on the middle passage, on the various projects for redemptive return to an African homeland, on the circulation of ideas and activists as well as the movement of key cultural and political artefacts: tracts, books, gramophone records, and choirs. (4)

More and more I’ve been pondering on this thought that my real home IS NOT West Africa.. It’s Good Intent, Hope, Jesus (names of real slaveships). Perhaps this is where “I” was first made. The hell of the slave ship is my inheritance. 
howtobeterrell:

    An enslaved African draws a slave ship on a wall in Brazil. Centuries later Jean Michel Basquiat does the same in his famous graffiti lettering, introducing the world of high art and wealth to Hip Hop. 
What do these ambitious drawings tell us about our naming? “The Tribe of the Middle Passage” as Saidiya Hartman calls it in Lose Your Mother. 
 Consider Paul Gilroy in The Black Atlantic: 

I have settled on the image of ships in motion across the spaces between Europe, America, Africa, and the Caribbean as a central organising symbol for this enterprise and as my starting point. The image of the ship— a living, microcultural, micro-political system in motion— is especially important for historical and theoretical reasons…. Ships immediately focus attention on the middle passage, on the various projects for redemptive return to an African homeland, on the circulation of ideas and activists as well as the movement of key cultural and political artefacts: tracts, books, gramophone records, and choirs. (4)

More and more I’ve been pondering on this thought that my real home IS NOT West Africa.. It’s Good Intent, Hope, Jesus (names of real slaveships). Perhaps this is where “I” was first made. The hell of the slave ship is my inheritance. 
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Write about Black History - We’ll Publish you.
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